Lead the Change interview with John Hattie

Dr. John Hattie

Dr. John Hattie

John Hattie is Professor and Director of the Melbourne Education Research Institute at the University of Melbourne, Australia and chair of the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership. He is the author of Visible Learning, Visible Learning for Teachers, Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn, and Visible Learning into Action. He is also co-editor of the International Guide to Student Achievement.

John Hattie’s influential 2008 book Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement is believed to be the world’s largest evidence-based study into the factors which improve student learning. Involving more than 80 million students from around the world and bringing together 50,000 smaller studies, the study found positive teacher-student interaction is the most important factor in effective teaching.

In this interview, which is part of the Lead the Change Series of the American Educational Research Association Educational Change Special Interest Group, Hattie shares his thoughts on the most important issues in educational change today:

The most important issue is scalability. There is a rich source of educational research, there are so many excellent educators in our schools and universities, and there is so much we know about what this success looks like. The missing ingredient is how to scale this success.

This Lead the Change interview appears as part of a series that features experts from around the globe, highlights promising research and practice, and offers expert insight on small- and large-scale educational change. Recently Lead the Change has also published interviews with Diane Ravitch, and the contributors to Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges, and Lessons on Whole-System Reform (Teachers College Press, 2013) edited by Helen Janc Malone, have participated in a series of blogs from Education Week.

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