Category Archives: Videos

Links to videos about international educational issues.

The Global Intensification of Supplementary Education

The following post was originally published by the Asia Pacific Memo on February 18, 2014.

Memo #271

Featuring Julian Dierkes

Recently, Ee-Seul Yoon of the Faculty of Education at UBC in coordination with the Asia Pacific Memo sat down with Dr. Julian Dierkes, Associate Professor and Keidanren Chair in Japanese Research at UBC’s Institute for Asian Research, to pose a few questions about Professor Dierkes’ recently co-edited volume, Out of the Shadows: The Global Intensification Of Supplementary Education, which was published in December 2013.

In our discussion, Dr. Dierkes presents an overview of the changing status and burgeoning popularity of supplementary education (that is, informal education received outside the traditional classroom) and what ramifications this is having on students, teachers, parents, education policy, and the political process—in Canada, Japan, Asia and even more globally. Finally, he touches upon how supplementary education itself is evolving as well as the present status of academic interest in the phenomenon of informal education.

Julian Dierkes is an Associate Professor and the Keidanren Chair in Japanese Research at the Institute for Asian Research at the University of British Columbia, where his research interests are in the area of comparative political sociology and the sociology of education.

Links

Janice Aurini, Scott Davies, and Julian Dierkes, Out of the Shadows: The Global Intensification Of Supplementary Education (Emerald, 2013)

Jukupedia, “Shadowing Education,” February 2014

Julian Dierkes, “Is South Korea’s Hyper-Education System the Future?,” Asia Pacific Memo #2

Husaina Kenayathulla, “Private Tutoring in Malaysia: Regulating for Quality,” Asia Pacific Memo #126

Teacher evaluation at the heart of protests over Mexico education reforms

Omar Torres/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Omar Torres/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

As reported in The New York Times yesterday, teachers took to the streets of Mexico City to protest the country’s education overhaul program.   The teachers occupied public spaces, blocked access to hotels and the airport, and warned of greater mobilization in coming days. They are protesting the fact that the coming education reforms promise to weed out underperforming teachers, raise hiring standards, and weaken the union. Prior demonstrations have already succeeded in pushing lawmakers to forego an evaluation requirement aimed at halting the practice of buying and selling teaching jobs. According to the article, “Teachers buy, sell or inherit positions as though they were family heirlooms. Removing poorly performing teachers is virtually impossible, even over allegations of sexual or substance abuse.”  The new law would make teacher evaluations obligatory every four years.

see prior IEN reports:

Mexico Approves Massive Education Reform

Reforms in India and Mexico in the Journal of Educational Change

Scan of Ed News: Protests, Unions, and Educational Funding

Pakistan

Malala Yousafzai: Pakistan observes day of prayer

BBC (October 12, 2012)

Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai, who wrote a diary for BBC Urdu about education under the Taliban, was accused by the Taliban of “promoting secularism,” and attacked by a gunman who shot her in the head and neck while on a school bus returning home from school. Using the pen-name Gul Makai, she wrote about the suffering caused by militants who had taken control of the Swat Valley in 2007 and ordered girls’ schools to close.

For more information:

Diary of a Pakistani Schoolgirl

Malala Yousafzai: Pakistan observes day of prayer

Pakistan: Quality Education Still a Long Way Off

IRIN (October 9, 2012)

Photo: Rebecca Conway/IRIN

Despite the fact that state-run primary schools do not charge fees and many provide free textbooks, other expenses mean that for many poor families, schools are unaffordable. As a result, unofficial schools have been providing an education to children who live on the streets, or work in markets and houses.

Education was made a fundamental constitutional right for the children of Pakistan in 2010; however the country has made limited progress in improving the quality and reach of its education system, and millions of children are missing out on schooling altogether in what the governments of Pakistan and the UK have termed an “education emergency.” As a result, Pakistan will not be able to meet its Millennium Development Goal of universal education by 2015.

For more information:

Protection of Street Children’s Rights Linked to Education

Boards For Action Against Teachers Refusing Exam Duties

Govt Has Taken New Initiatives on Education: Minister

The News International (October 7, 2012)

Punjab Minister for Education, Mian Mujtaba Shuja-ur-Rehman on Friday said that complete elimination of terrorism and extremism was must for peace and prosperity of the country.

The ILM Ideas Program, a three-year program funded by UKaid from the Department of International Development that is aimed at increasing access to quality education, held a launch to announce its second Request for Applications (RFA) to grant awards nationwide for increasing the access to quality education for children aged 5-16 years at a local hotel. The event included an Innovation Education Expo, which showcased ideas an innovation funded under the Ilm Ideas portfolio and demonstrated ideas such as radio learning, satellite enabled mobile vans, and digital whiteboards.

For more information:

World Bank gives $3 Million to Education

Elimination of terrorism must for peace: minister

 

Australia

Australia: Class War in the Classroom?

Privatisation in Education Research Initiative (October 8, 2012)

Prime Minister Gillard

Amid debate over government spending on private schools, Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard is in the process of negotiating a new school funding deal. Gillard wants to increase education funding by $6.5 billion a year, provided that reforms be implemented to improve teacher quality and student performance. As previously reported, Gillard’s goal is for Australian students to be ranked among the top five countries in math, reading, and science, by 2025. While her plan would increase funding for private as well as public schools, Opposition Leader Tony Abbott believes private schools will suffer as a result of the plan.

For more information:

Video: OECD Education at a Glance 2012

Gillard Delivers School Funding Plan

Prime Minister Julia Gillard Says That Private Schools Will Get More

Australia

PM Pledge for Top Five School Spot

Michelle Grattan, The Age (September 7, 2012)

The Australian Prime Minister, Julia Gillard, announced a new school funding arrangment (dubbed the “Gonksi Plan”), promised to “legislate for a goal of having Australia in the top five schooling systems in the world by 2025.” By then, Gillard said that Australia should be among the top five nations in reading, science, and math, and be noted for the provision of high quality and equity education. Among other things, the Gonski funding plan recommended an extra $5 billion a year overall (in 2009 dollars) for school funding, and variables such as economic disadvantage, disability, school size and the particular needs of indigenous students.

For more information:

“PM Pledge for Top Five School Spot” (video clip)

In a panel discussion, presented by La Trobe University, Ideas and Society Program, May 2012, Carmen Lawrence, Richard Teese, Dennis Altman and (host) Lorraine Ling, discuss the Gonski Report and educational issues present in Australia today.

Experts respond to Gillard’s announcement.

South Korea

Changing evolution theory to creationism in textbooks, that is ridiculous around the world (in Korean)
Chosun Ilbo (6 June 2012)

Controversy has ensued as to whether the biology textbook should change its coverage of evolutionary theory to creationism.  The Unified Association, along with those who refute the biological theory of evolution, urge that creationism be instituted in schools.  Biologists, however, say that if evolutionary theory is replaced in textbooks, it will be a “nonsense” event.  As a result, the biologists are insisting that no change be made in the textbooks, ensuring that creationism is still taught in schools.

The following video highlights the debate over the textbook debate in South Korea:

England

Return of the O-Level: Gove announces radical plan to scrap GCSEs ‘to ensure UK has a world-class education system’ but  lack of consultation angers Lib Dems  
Shipman, T.  The Daily Mail (21 June 2012)

A leaked document from the Ministry of Education indicates that Education Minister Michael Gove wants to reform the examination system to return to a two tiered approach that Margaret Thatcher’s conservative government abolished over 30 years ago.  The so-called right wing media has depicted the British education system as failing, although criticism about the state of the education system has surfaced from all sides in light of the leaked document — from within the Conservative Party as well as from Liberal Democrat Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister of the Coalition.  (Clegg said Gove’s proposal would “turn the clock back” to the 1950s.)  Those opposed to the two tiered examination system argue that this system would contribute further to educational inequality, halting social mobility amongst the nation’s poorest children.

The following video summarizes Clegg’s opposition to Gove’s proposal: